Penthouse by Atelier Pierre Thibault

Located in Montreal, Canada, this inspiring penthouse apartment was designed in 2014 by Atelier Pierre Thibault.

Description by Atelier Pierre Thibault

The project was to design the interior of a penthouse located in a building under construction. Only the exterior walls and the floor were built. This empty shell allowed for a great liberty in planning the interior. The exterior walls made solely of windows, the large terrace that received the sun towards the end of the day, the high ceiling and the grandiose view on downtown Montreal and the Stock Exchange Tower were all elements that had to be considered.

The clients, being students who share this apartment, it was important to thoughtfully separate the common areas from the private spaces. Each bedroom had to have its own private bathroom, while the living room, the kitchen, the dining room and the terrace had to be vast and open in order to accommodate several people simultaneously. A space serving both as an office and a separate TV room was also required.

It is in that spirit that the penthouse was conceptualized. The common spaces are organized along the terrace and therefor extend outside. The kitchen is located underneath the second floor bedroom while the dining room and the living room enjoy a double height ceiling. The entrance is hidden behind the extension of the kitchen furniture. The minimalist staircase separates the bedroom and the office from the
common spaces. A desk is placed upstairs, in the mezzanine in one of the two rooms, but it is positioned so as to have a view outside instead of a view on the privacy of the bedroom.

The built-in furniture allows plenty of storage while minimizing its impact on the space. Thus, the kitchen furniture also conceals the laundry room and a cloakroom for the entrance. The base of the bed serves as an additional storage space while its headboard conceals a walk-in and a complete bathroom. In the other room, the headboard of the bed separates the room from the walk-in in addition to integrating storage and a bedside table. A great seat by the window extends all the way to the bathroom, thus hiding the heating system. A small door opens to the common area below, like a Juliet balcony.

The space is minimally dressed, white is predominant. The floors are left on the concrete slab. The wood was used to mark certain elements such as the built-in furniture and the interior doors. In order to mark the difference between private and common spaces, the type of wood differs depending on the character of the spaces; oak mainly in the kitchen and the living room, walnut for the bedroom furniture.

Photography by Ben Meir Ohayon

Visit Atelier Pierre Thibault

- by Matt Watts